12-07-2013

Unmissable unmessable Bistroteque

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You cannot miss out this hipster restaurant inl east London! Head to the first floor of this East End trendsetter for the light, white restaurant and big oval bar (the Manchichi, where walk-ins can eat and good cocktails are mixed). The welcome and service are friendly, and there’s a level of professionalism here that’s missing from many local restaurants.

Pricing is variable too – the generous prix fixe costs £17.50 for three good-sized courses, while a tiny portion of cured salmon salad with beetroot and horseradish remoulade was £14 (we can’t imagine what the £8 size looks like).

The menu (and short wine list) is more French-leaning than truly Gallic: a cheeseburger with pancetta and caramelised onions sits alongside onglet with chips and béarnaise sauce, and treacle tart with clotted cream next to crème brûlée.

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What we love bust though is the popular weekend brunch adds the likes of (US-style) pancakes with bacon and maple syrup to the mix. Less welcome at brunch are the 90-minute dining slots, and the tables set uncomfortably close to the piano. Overall, it’s a reliable but fun restaurant that hasn’t become complacent.

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However, the real draw is the entertainment: Bistrotheque’s little black-box stage is the beating heart of east London’s alt performance scene. It’s Jonny Woo’s regular spot for seasoned routines and new experiments; it’s where musical terrorists Bourgeois & Maurice made their name; it’s where alt-dragsters the Lipsinkers cut loose.
If you have being living without then hurry up! time to book it!

where?
020 8983 7900
23–27 Wadeson Street
London E2 9DR
reception@bistrotheque.com

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07-07-2013

ABSOLUT VODKA new designers

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ABSOLUT Vodka has a strong heritage of partnering with the
creative community. Since the first reinterpretation by Andy Warhol in the early 1980s, the brand has invited hundreds of artists and designers to create thousands of adaptations of the
iconic ABSOLUT bottle. This year at New Designers, ABSOLUT invites participating graduates (and not only) to join the long line of collaborators, by creating their own design.

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06-07-2013

Club to Catwalk @V&A

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Discover the creative explosion of London fashion in the 1980s in a major exhibition at the V&A. Through more than 85 outfits, Club to Catwalk: London Fashion in the 1980s showcases the bold and exciting new looks by the most experimental young designers of the decade, including Betty Jackson, Katharine Hamnett, Wendy Dagworthy and John Galliano.
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The exhibition traces the emerging theatricality in British fashion as the capital’s vibrant and eclectic club scene influenced a new generation of designers. Also celebrating iconic styles such as New Romantic and High Camp, and featuring outfits worn by Adam Ant and Leigh Bowery, the exhibition explores how the creative relationship between catwalk and club wear helped reinvent fashion, as reflected in magazines such as i-D and Blitz and venues including Heaven and Taboo.

http://www.vam.ac.uk/whatson/event/2547/club-to-catwalk-3852

01-07-2013

Day and night become one with FILLES A PAPA

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loving this new brand FILLES A PAPA, conceived and designed by two sisters: boundaries collapse between formal and casual wear, masculine and feminine, rough and refined. Sequins adorn utility shapes, while oversize styles are combined with skinnier fits. Rich in contrasts and influences, FILLES A PAPA’s clothes are energetic, smart and uninhibited. Day and night become one, while sartorial codes clash and blur, offering a new chemistry for modern girls.
FAP is an instinctive, honest and spontaneous brand. Created for girls who naturally ooze confidence, Carol and Sarah’s clothes are for the rebellious, the playful and the liberated. Finding their sources of inspiration within Punk and Rock’n’Roll culture, they have developed a wardrobe made out of strong and assertive looks, hovering between American sportswear and European chic. Their collections are a message of freedom and independence, worn with aplomb and fitting bodies closely. Debbie Harry’s cheekiness and Kim Gordon’s ageless glamor come to mind.
Graphic and structured at the same time, jackets have a slimming effect on the silhouette and legs are shown off in tight pants. Evening fabrics lose some of their drama in comfortable and fluid shapes, as easy to wear as a tee-shirt. Layered according to circumstances, and made for everyday life, Filles A Papa’s garments quickly become stylish friends. Refusing to take themselves too seriously, Carol and Sarah are having fun with fashion, celebrating its vitality and paradoxical nature.

find out more fillesapapa.com
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